Category Archives: Marketing

Kevin Knebl highlights an event in Woodland Park on January 15, 2020

The Nonprofit Cooperative of Teller County hosts an event at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in January and Knebl participates via live webinar. “Social Media in OUR Backyard” is part one of two events Kevin Knebl participates in. All activities benefit individuals interested in expanding business through their use of social media. Save your seat now:

Buy one ticket for $15 or Buy two for $20 and invite a friend

The event is sponsored by: A-Z Storage, Harmonized Brain Centers COS, PaleoBond and the Nonprofit Cooperative of Teller County

Door prizes, food and a panel of people using social media to promote their work are in the room. The room accommodates 100 people and networking is encouraged. If the weather is bad the link for the live webinar is shared so you can participate from home. Buy your seat now!

More Fundraising Ideas

  • Paper calendars are still hanging on people’s walls. Determine what you think would sell in your market – only get a limited number of calendars printed – take orders now and deliver in December
  • Offer a training on something and collect money from people for attending. Usually, there’s a professional out there willing to train in return for a small fee and the opportunity to sell something during the training
  • Canvas shopping bags work well when you partner with a shopping district. Woodland Park Main Street has cornered the market on this idea in their small town. They include coupons in the bag from participating businesses and then they sell the bags at other events for $10 – $15, woodlandparkmainstreet.org
  • Write a book about the history of your organization – or another popular subject. Self-publish and sell the book. This also works well with cookbooks
  • Find a way to share your mission by including others. The Mountain Top Cycling Club in Teller County has a “Bike the Night” to bring families out for a bicycle ride. People pay for the opportunity to participate, they get a glow in the dark t-shirt, and have a pizza party after the ride – mountaintopcyclingclub.com
  • Host a festive gathering for families. The Made for More project has a colorful pumpkin festival coming up. This is when the community comes together to celebrate the harvest of pumpkins – madeformoreproject.org

Think of your fundraisers as a way to market your organization. Sometimes, a fundraiser takes time to catch on. The first time you do it may not be as exciting because the results were not what you expected but if you keep a positive attitude, plan for the next time, and learn as you go – things always get better.

Nonprofits – Beat the Odds of Fundraising by Being Cooperative

Beat the odds. Fundraising can be difficult, especially in a small community or micro community within a large city. Those raising money as well as those who contribute often view fundraisers as an unpleasant task. How do you make it easier? You already know a person will say yes before you ask for something.

Getting the YES takes time and energy. Many times, in the small community (micro-communities too), there tends to be a fear of losing. This ultimately fractures relationships and makes fundraising a competition. It takes a powerful organization already in the “circle” to say, “We won’t be part of an alliance if we’re not ALL going to be cooperative and work alongside each other.”

24 nonprofits have come together in Teller County Colorado to form the Nonprofit Cooperative. This is an example of how working together benefits all. They are sharing resources and training information. There’s organizations collaborating on events and it is more about helping each other to be successful than it is to be in competition.

To learn more about doing this in your community, send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com/ Be the organization to bring it all together. Watch success grow as Giving Back becomes reality.

Taking it Easy on Donors

Donors have a giving heart. They are asked more often than not to consider giving. Ask a donor, “What can I do for you?” and they will probably sidestep the conversation. It’s not something they’re comfortable discussing. It’s not supposed to be about them in their mind because it’s about others.

Understanding how a donor feels is important. You show a quality mindset when you take time to understand their intent and then provide opportunities for them to benefit. It is a nice way to “give back.” These six powerful words, “what can I do for you,” have the ability to transform a situation. It’s a way to shift the discussion and put the energy back on making someone else happy. In this case, it is your donor.

Consider this – more than half of all people who visit a nonprofit’s website do so from a mobile device according to Mobilecause.com. This is an old statistic so the numbers are much higher now. What does your website look like on a mobile platform? Check it out on your phone and make sure it is user-friendly. Is there a donor button? It’s not just about having a “donate now” button because a “donor” button is more about the emotional component of why they give. A donor button is about telling your story, and also about sharing with donors the benefit of why giving to your organization is important. The button explains what’s in it for them? This is that uncomfortable situation again. But, it’s true. What’s in it for them? They can feel good about giving to a cause and get a spiritual kudo just about anywhere. They can get a tax benefit for specific kinds of donations. Sure, this works. But, they can also GIVE to any organization to get the same rewards. Why would they give to yours?

Setting yourself up for success begins on the backend. It’s your opportunity to set the stage first. Begin by doing this:

  • Check your mobile platform for your website’s format and message. This is the the way most people are seeing you. Connect with your website designer as necessary to update for mobile changes
  • Be up to date on social media, other online sites, and with phone messaging systems. Call yourself and your answering system through the office. What message do you hear? Do you have recent posts on social media and on your website? It takes time and is often put on the bottom of the list. Dedicating a couple of hours each week to this process, or finding a volunteer to do it, makes the world of difference in the end
  • Make a list of the ways you’re giving back to donors and add to the list while remembering, each donor is different and it takes some time to discover the intricacies of what’s most important to them. This is about taking the time for discovery and then taking the time to establish a plan to let your donor know they are your most important asset.

The people you serve are most important to your mission. The people who help you serve are your greatest asset. An asset is the people volunteering, working for you, or those who provide a means for your service. A donor, a sponsor, or a foundation provide the means by giving money for your mission to continue. Taking it easy on donors is key to your success.

For additional information on coaching through the fundraising process – connect with SOAR with Network Fundraising. The programs are cost-effective and focused on your mission. There’s not a cookie-cutter approach to taking it easy on donors, providing the right message or opportunities to be involved, and engaging the public. Each situation is different. SOAR coaching offers the training and then the follow up. The Leader’s Program creates sustainability through a year-long program. Click Here!

Nonprofits Giving Back

Giving is something people do for nonprofits. Giving back is how the nonprofit returns the favor, so to speak. We feature in articles how people give back to others. It opens the door to a giving mentality, which is good in any walk of life. Interested in sharing how you give back? Send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com/ This opportunity is open to anyone!

Operation Care International

Operation Care International is a homeless and impoverished ministry providing personal items, blue jeans, winter gear, bottled water and bibles in the streets of Dallas. Susie Jennings is the Founder and President of the mission. It all started with her mission to give blankets to the homeless under a bridge in 1993.

Susie, how does your organization give back to donors and sponsors?

  • We thank them with personal phone calls
  • We give them a photo album, which includes them serving at our event
  • We send a video and report of the event
  • We send testimonial videos
  • We put their names in event programs
  • We make them honorary chairs
  • We take them to lunch
  • We send cards on holidays and birthdays
  • We visit them
  • We ask them to be part of the program

Susie, what simple thing can a person do to create a feeling of community?

  • Bring personal care products in your car
  • Buy some gift cards from fast food restaurants and keep them handy
  • Have a directory of places where the homeless can go in your area
  • Connect the homeless to community services, which can help them

Susie, what does Operation Care International do?

Our signature event happens on the 3rd Saturday of December when we hold a birthday party for Jesus honoring our homeless and impoverished children and families in Dallas, Texas.

The heart of the ministry is sharing the love of God to the people.

On the day of the event we provide our trademark activity of foot washing; emulating the character of Christ and also:

  • Evangelism and prayer
  • Bibles
  • Socks and shoes
  • Medical, dental and vision services
  • Personal care items (toothbrush, toothpaste, etc.)
  • Clothing, coats, sleeping bags, blankets
  • Hot meals
  • Haircuts and makeovers
  • Praise and worship teams/Entertainers
  • Free phone calls
  • Homeless service providers (lawyers, jobs, housing for kids)
  • Toys
  • Back packs
  • Books
  • Food

Susie Jennings is the author of 31 Days of Mountaintop Miracles. She began Operation Care while also being a full time RN. Her story is amazing. Truly a life of miracles. Contact Operation Care at 972-681-3567 or info@OpCare.org

The Business to do it First in a Community WINS!

Step one: One person decides they want to spearhead the cause marketing program in their community and they are backed by their company to explore the ROI. It’s a perfect opportunity for a community relations person in a marketing department. It’s the way to develop a lasting, sustainable way to improve business, and it comes out of the goodness of your heart! It’s people to people marketing, relationship development, at its best.

SOAR opens doors for a new business owner to expand their market.

Look at this great list of perks you get when you choose to develop a nonprofit cooperative:

  • You are the only one being trained by SOAR in your county to implement the cooperative (as long as you remain in the program)
  • SOAR backs the program with 100% positive results for growing market share
  • You’re introduced to a philanthropic tool to market a business (cause marketing)
  • You learn a proven method to grow your market and achieve success
  • There are opportunities to create social impact
  • You’re guided to establish your role as the “Community Connector”
  • You become spotlighted as a prominent organization in the community because you’re giving in a sustainable way to a vulnerable segment of society
  • A reflection of change is prepared, through monthly progress reports, for the leaders of your company

Pay $15 and schedule the call to get started with increasing your market – click here!

We help you:

  • Establish communications within your community for the cooperative
  • Put together an effective growth plan

WHY A NONPROFIT COOPERATIVE?

Small communities (county population under 30,000) have put together nonprofit cooperatives to enhance individual success through group success. It’s the philosophy of giving back in order to move forward. Gayle Gross, founder and CEO of SOAR with Network Fundraising, lives by this philosophy. She gives nonprofits in small communities an opportunity to create their own success by developing a cooperative program. This program is usually spearheaded by a business hoping to create social impact by becoming the “community connector.”


BENEFITS OF A NONPROFIT COOPERATIVE

The Nonprofit Cooperative relieves donor fatigue. People get tired of being asked over and over again for money. Imagine – you are the business, which relieves this stress for other people in town. They will admire your effort. You become a hero in their eyes. Your business becomes the one people frequent and refer people to.

Donor fatigue happens a lot in small communities. It’s where the ratio of nonprofits to potential donors is lopsided. It is quickly apparent, the Nonprofit Cooperative lessens burnout for fundraising professionals. There’s an immediate support system among peers, nonprofit events cease to overlap, and people in the community begin to see the benefit of their unity. Organizations gain credibility. Marketing is often done together and this helps to reduce costs for the nonprofits who do not have expendable income.


WHO BENEFITS MOST IN A COMMUNITY?

Everyone!

  • For-profit businesses have the opportunity to spearhead the program and they get in touch with nonprofits in the community. All nonprofits have their network of followers. The for-profit also becomes the “community connector” in their area, which is a powerful marketing tool
  • Nonprofits learn how to collaborate effectively to increase their bottom line. There’s greater awareness and opportunities
  • The community is relieved of donor fatigue

what does it cost for a person to implement the nonprofit cooperative?

$15 or the initial call to discuss specifics with SOAR.

$1200 for a year of coaching plus $300 for materials.

Total is $1500 for an organization to learn the system, get training materials and to be coached for a year. (The $15 for the first call is deducted from the coaching fee.)

A person is encouraged to maintain the program for at least three years after the initial startup of the program. Maintenance includes three training calls and any documents, which are updated during the year. The fee is $300 per year. This fee can change. You can lock in the total price when you pay $2400 upfront. In total, $2400 is for four years of coaching to help you develop a sustainable platform for your cause marketing program.


WHY LISTEN TO SOAR’S FOUNDER AND GET INVOLVED?

Why listen to Gayle? It’s in your best interest if you want to grow market share and make money. There’s proven success 100% of the time. It pays to know where your money is going and if it will have the most impact. Follow her plan and it is guaranteed to grow beyond your expectations.

Ready? Make a payment of $15 for a first call (15 minutes) to discuss how the program looks for your community. It is determined during this call to be a good fit or not. Schedule call – click here!

Nonprofits Collaborate in Teller County, Colorado To Create Impact

The Nonprofit Cooperative in Teller County, Colorado is a project of SOAR with Network Fundraising. Organizations represented at the meeting on January 8 were:

  • Mountain Top Cycling Club
  • Teller County Farmer’s Market Association
  • Woodland Park Farmer’s Market
  • Woodland Park Main Street
  • Colorado Phoenix Project
  • Junior Achievement of Teller County
  • Pikes Peak Rotary Club
  • Lighter Side of Christmas Parade
  • Woodland Park Wind Symphony
  • Teller Safe Harbor
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • Friends of Mueller State Park
  • UC Health
  • Friends of the Florissant Fossil Beds
  • Pikes Peak Historical Society
  • DayBreak – An Adult Day Program
  • Pikes Peak Lions Club
  • Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church

Helping nonprofits develop into a collaborative effort is what SOAR is doing in Teller County. Organizations work together and create impact for their community through economic vitality. As a result of the meeting on January 8th, TCRAS changed the date of a fundraiser they have because it overlapped with something Habitat was doing on the same day.

Participants of the cooperative effort receive training on how to be impactful. It’s not a membership organization, it’s people who choose to work together for the better good of the organizations they represent.

Cooperative means everyone gets a vote, decisions are made as a group, and there’s greater potential for success while everyone works in tandem. Do you want to learn more about bringing this project to your small community? It increases exposure, opportunities, and market share (fundraising). Set up time to learn more about the program and how to be a participant. Email: iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com

Moving forward, an organization in the cooperative of Teller County has 23 opportunities to market their program. This includes attending trainings, collaborative networking events, participating in together-marketing campaigns, and attending happy hours.

The goal is to make SOAR’s project available in communities with less than 30,000 people. Be part of the movement and connect today.

Email: iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com

Successful Fundraising IS Being a Good Leader

You may be wondering how you can tell if you’re a good leader at fundraising. Well, let’s look at what you’re doing now to raise money.

  1. Do you have a process for raising money and if so, have you taught other people how to use the process?
  2. Are you currently meeting with a group of people focused on helping you with your organization’s mission? Do you consider those people partners in helping you to raise money? If so, can you gauge their involvement and see the results (in dollars) of their participation?
  3. Can the people helping you carry on the fundraising mission when you’re not with them?

There are five total questions.

  • Three “yes” answers = leading effectively
  • Four “yes” answers = leading others and getting results
  • Five “yes” answers = It’s time to back off and bring others up to your level – make them leaders. That’s what leaders do. GROW leaders around them and let them lead.

3D Leadership CrosswordWE are at five “yes” answers at SOAR and we’re ready to raise people up to lead! Why…

  • Raising money is a challenge, and we have alot of the answers, but not all of them. Other leaders will bring new perspective.
  • SOAR is a fundraising acronym, which reminds a person to do four things. We believe it’s time more people know how simple raising money can be when they follow an easy pattern
  • We consistently shift the natural pattern of I/we WANT to I/we HAVE and there’s no reason why more people can’t learn the system

Getting people to be leaders with SOAR – We provide a SOAR membership and it’s so inexpensive  – $15 /month or $180 per year. You get support to grow your community and raise more money. Learn more about membership here: Click Here!

We are willing to let a person sign up for the year all at one time with 20% off the cost.

If you want to pay for the year and get more value with 20% off – send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com and mention the SOAR 20% special.

 

Corporations call fundraising “increasing market share.” Non-profits call it creating sustainability.

Keeping a development professional longer than the average 18 months is important to a successful run at growing community and raising money. The Founder of SOAR stood in the shoes of a development professional for a corporation and also a non-profit for many years. Corporations call fundraising “increasing market share.” Non-profits call it creating sustainability.

UNTIL SOAR developed there was stress, loss of sleep, and she was driven to work long hours UNTIL a successful system was put into place. She discovered following four simple steps created results and kept her focused. Other people in the organizations where she worked were not worrying about how the money was raised. They just wanted the results.

The development professional – SOAR’s founder – was in a very unhealthy situation UNTIL the successful system (SOAR) created astounding results – WINNING results – quickly and efficiently within four months. STRESS & LOSS OF SLEEP ended immediately and the role of the development professional became a job of managing relationships instead of begging for money. There were people helping to raise money! Dollars continued to increase as community began to GROW.

The truth is, people liked the process so much it increased the market share 126% in four months. SOAR’s program was published and a membership program built. Now, development professionals come to SOAR for support. They pay $34 a month for the privilege of having a fundraising professional in their corner.

Support with SOAR membership looks like this (three highlights):

  • Group contact with other fundraising professionals to get ideas AND see what really works prior to investing too much time and energy
  • Trainings and meetings for development professionals are organized – you just show up
  • SOAR is available for your call – you can share what you’ve having trouble with and SOAR offers advice on the best steps to proceed

Ready to spend $34 on your future success with fundraising – click here!

Unsure of how SOAR fits into your current fundraising program? Schedule a brief strategy call – click here!

 

Relationships with Grantors – Four Tips

We love this statement by Amy Clinton, “The overall success of a grant writer should ultimately be measured by whether or not the organization for which that person is writing grants is building relationships and program credibility with funders and achieving incremental increases in grant funding revenues.”

Recently, an organization in our community saw the deletion of a grant they depended on. It was something they had received for years and at the end, the $125,000 they received last year, just went away without warning. That destroys programs and, it did! The program it funded was shut down.

Relationships and program credibility – how are you building them?

Tip #1: Share your message as often as you can with as many people as you can in the most-effective way.

Tip #2: Offer opportunities for people to be involved in your program and even invite the people within the organization/foundation granting money. They are not likely to attend but will appreciate the thought of inclusion to see how their money is being used.

Tip #3: Accept the way people participate in your program. This helps you to keep momentum going and maintains a positive perspective. A happy person says good things and can provide a testimonial for you later on. This looks good on applications.

Tip#4: Respect and appreciate everyone within your community. By this, we mean anyone associated with your mission and your organization. The same is true with those organizations offering similar services. Maintain the feeling of abundance. There’s enough to go around. Be thankful. SOAR (acronym for relationship development, which is outlined above).

Consider the following data, also provided by Amy Clinton (see her full article):

1. If an organization is submitting applications to already-established funders who know them well, they can expect:

a. For existing programs, high success rates, up to 90 percent
b. For expanding existing programs, good success rates, up to 80 percent
c. For new programs, lower success rates, generally 30 to 40 percent

2. If submitting applications to NEW funders, an excellent success rate would be 30 to 40 percent

3. If submitting applications to a combination of existing and new funders, an organization should expect a success rate of between 50 and 60 percent.


#soarwithnetworkfundraising assists organizations and individuals when they are determining the best way to GROW Community among their constituents. Increasing market share and raising money goes hand in hand. It’s easy when you choose to SOAR.

choosing to SOAR