Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Business to do it First in a Community WINS!

Step one: One person decides they want to spearhead the cause marketing program in their community and they are backed by their company to explore the ROI. It’s a perfect opportunity for a community relations person in a marketing department. It’s the way to develop a lasting, sustainable way to improve business, and it comes out of the goodness of your heart! It’s people to people marketing, relationship development, at its best.

SOAR opens doors for a new business owner to expand their market.

Look at this great list of perks you get when you choose to develop a nonprofit cooperative:

  • You are the only one being trained by SOAR in your county to implement the cooperative (as long as you remain in the program)
  • SOAR backs the program with 100% positive results for growing market share
  • You’re introduced to a philanthropic tool to market a business (cause marketing)
  • You learn a proven method to grow your market and achieve success
  • There are opportunities to create social impact
  • You’re guided to establish your role as the “Community Connector”
  • You become spotlighted as a prominent organization in the community because you’re giving in a sustainable way to a vulnerable segment of society
  • A reflection of change is prepared, through monthly progress reports, for the leaders of your company

Schedule a call or send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.org

We help you:

  • Establish communications within your community for the cooperative
  • Put together an effective growth plan

WHY A NONPROFIT COOPERATIVE?

Small communities (county population under 30,000) have put together nonprofit cooperatives to enhance individual success through group success. It’s the philosophy of giving back in order to move forward. Gayle Gross, founder and CEO of SOAR with Network Fundraising, lives by this philosophy. She gives nonprofits in small communities an opportunity to create their own success by developing a cooperative program. This program is usually spearheaded by a business hoping to create social impact by becoming the “community connector.”


BENEFITS OF A NONPROFIT COOPERATIVE

The Nonprofit Cooperative relieves donor fatigue. People get tired of being asked over and over again for money. Imagine – you are the business, which relieves this stress for other people in town. They will admire your effort. You become a hero in their eyes. Your business becomes the one people frequent and refer people to.

Donor fatigue happens a lot in small communities. It’s where the ratio of nonprofits to potential donors is lopsided. It is quickly apparent, the Nonprofit Cooperative lessens burnout for fundraising professionals. There’s an immediate support system among peers, nonprofit events cease to overlap, and people in the community begin to see the benefit of their unity. Organizations gain credibility. Marketing is often done together and this helps to reduce costs for the nonprofits who do not have expendable income.


WHO BENEFITS MOST IN A COMMUNITY?

Everyone!

  • For-profit businesses have the opportunity to spearhead the program and they get in touch with nonprofits in the community. All nonprofits have their network of followers. The for-profit also becomes the “community connector” in their area, which is a powerful marketing tool
  • Nonprofits learn how to collaborate effectively to increase their bottom line. There’s greater awareness and opportunities
  • The community is relieved of donor fatigue

WHY LISTEN TO SOAR’S FOUNDER AND GET INVOLVED?

Why listen to Gayle? It’s in your best interest if you want to grow market share and make money. There’s proven success 100% of the time. It pays to know where your money is going and if it will have the most impact. Follow her plan and it is guaranteed to grow beyond your expectations.

Schedule a call or send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.org

Nonprofits Collaborate in Teller County, Colorado To Create Impact

The Nonprofit Cooperative in Teller County, Colorado is a project of SOAR with Network Fundraising. Organizations represented at the meeting on January 8 were:

  • Mountain Top Cycling Club
  • Teller County Farmer’s Market Association
  • Woodland Park Farmer’s Market
  • Woodland Park Main Street
  • Colorado Phoenix Project
  • Junior Achievement of Teller County
  • Pikes Peak Rotary Club
  • Lighter Side of Christmas Parade
  • Woodland Park Wind Symphony
  • Teller Safe Harbor
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • Friends of Mueller State Park
  • UC Health
  • Friends of the Florissant Fossil Beds
  • Pikes Peak Historical Society
  • DayBreak – An Adult Day Program
  • Pikes Peak Lions Club
  • Our Lady of the Woods Catholic Church

Helping nonprofits develop into a collaborative effort is what SOAR is doing in Teller County. Organizations work together and create impact for their community through economic vitality. As a result of the meeting on January 8th, TCRAS changed the date of a fundraiser they have because it overlapped with something Habitat was doing on the same day.

Participants of the cooperative effort receive training on how to be impactful. It’s not a membership organization, it’s people who choose to work together for the better good of the organizations they represent.

Cooperative means everyone gets a vote, decisions are made as a group, and there’s greater potential for success while everyone works in tandem. Do you want to learn more about bringing this project to your small community? It increases exposure, opportunities, and market share (fundraising). Set up time to learn more about the program and how to be a participant. Email: iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com

Moving forward, an organization in the cooperative of Teller County has 23 opportunities to market their program. This includes attending trainings, collaborative networking events, participating in together-marketing campaigns, and attending happy hours.

The goal is to make SOAR’s project available in communities with less than 30,000 people. Be part of the movement and connect today.

Schedule a call or send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.org

Event Planning, Marketing and Fundraising Through Events


Event Planning

Start with the idea and a simple plan. This is what you present to the people who will help you implement the idea.

  • Idea and simple plan (what, when, how, cost). Make sure to check the community calendar to make sure there’s no overlap with another event
  • Present to the people who will help to implement (include time commitment, role, and what’s in it for them). This is usually your board and/or volunteer team

Prepare to “give back” in a way that’s meaningful to the individuals helping you. It is important to know what this is before you ever ask anyone to do something for you.

Events are most-successful when the person leading the charge is not bogged down in the details. The “leader” becomes the person managing relationships and conducting follow up amongst the team.


Marketing An Event

  • Reserve marquees & sign space
  • Add to Community Calendars
  • Create social media posts and ask people to help by sharing (peer to peer)
  • Determine where you want to distribute advertisements (poster, banners, fliers) to determine quantity
  • Design and print marketing materials at least one month in advance and distribute (Have a catchy title and KNOW why people want to attend – make sure they understand WHY!! Make it personal)
  • Personal invitations to key stakeholders at least three weeks out (call is best) explaining the benefit to them for coming to your event. This could be a marketing initiative for them. They may get recognized. Your team can come up with a “script” and sit down to make calls together. This makes it fun
  • Keep a running list of people coming and provide a follow up message or call a few days before the event

Fundraising Through Events

  • Get to know the people attending your event
  • Have a volunteer with you, assisting with keeping track of the people you (leader) speak with. Write down suggested follow up, which is meaningful to an individual
  • Collect contact information from people who attend, a drawing can help if there’s no registration process
  • Develop a cultivation plan for deepening relationships with the people you meet (Thank you mailed, follow up email with something of interest for them, invitation to join organization’s Facebook page. These are all a good start!)
  • At your event, have information about the NEXT event/activity people can attend. It’s important to always have something coming up to invite people to. This can be a collaboration with another organization if you want. Think about who you’d like to partner with

Follow up is ongoing once a person becomes a donor.

Schedule a call or send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.org

Help a Donor Choose your Cause

Details below are given to businesses in order to help them choose a cause for their donation.

Excerpt from blog by Abby Quillen.

With more than 1 million non-profit foundations and charities in the U.S., it may be daunting to decide on a cause to support. Paradoxically, the more choices available, the harder it is to make a decision and act. Use these tips to find a cause that fits your company and gets results.

  • Find a charity that aligns with your company’s values
    What does your business do? What is your mission? If you’re in food service, for instance, maybe you’ll reach out to a non-profit focused on urban food insecurity or recycling. Or if you’re in the financial sector, you could look at one of the many nonprofits devoted to increasing financial literacy. Finding a charity that aligns with your company’s values is a great place to start.
  • Focus on impact
    Do you want to help women start small businesses, communities rebuild after disasters, children learn to read, or needy families have access to nutritious food? Visit a charity evaluator website, such as GiveWell, the Open Philanthropy Project, or the Foundational Research Institute, to compare the costs and effects of different interventions.
  • Do your research
    Before you commit to a cause, make sure it’s legitimate by checking a charity watchdog site such as CharityWatch, Charity Navigator, or BBB Wise Giving Alliance. Ideally, a charity should spend a majority of its funds on programs, not fundraising or administration.
  • Pay a visit
    By partnering with a local non-profit, you can help people in your local community and make it a better place to live. You’ll also have opportunities to sponsor team volunteer work days or local charity events. Before you partner with an organization, visit and observe their work first-hand.
  • Verify tax-exempt status
    Donations that meet certain requirements are tax-deductible. Before you commit to a cause, verify the non-profit group’s tax-exempt status by checking with the group or visiting the IRS website, and talk to your tax expert.

IMG_3399Gayle Gross developed a way for people to SOAR. Very valuable information is shared above, which is an the excerpt from the full article linked here at Zerocater.  Aligning a non-profit with a business to create social impact is paramount for today’s cause marketing approach. Gayle knows this and works with organizations to determine the best way to move forward in developing collaborative networking. There’s a program she helps organizations implement. It is the Nonprofit Cooperative. Schedule a call or send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.org

Why people choose to SOAR & develop a fundraising community.

Increase fundraising because you increase market share. (i.e. 126% in four months and 371% within sixteen months)

“Like” the Facebook Group (free) – check in here

Schedule a call or send an email to iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.org

Corporations call fundraising “increasing market share.” Non-profits call it creating sustainability.

Keeping a development professional longer than the average 18 months is important to a successful run at growing community and raising money. The Founder of SOAR stood in the shoes of a development professional for a corporation and also a non-profit for many years. Corporations call fundraising “increasing market share.” Non-profits call it creating sustainability.

UNTIL SOAR developed there was stress, loss of sleep, and she was driven to work long hours UNTIL a successful system was put into place. She discovered following four simple steps created results and kept her focused. Other people in the organizations where she worked were not worrying about how the money was raised. They just wanted the results.

The development professional – SOAR’s founder – was in a very unhealthy situation UNTIL the successful system (SOAR) created astounding results – WINNING results – quickly and efficiently within four months. STRESS & LOSS OF SLEEP ended immediately and the role of the development professional became a job of managing relationships instead of begging for money. There were people helping to raise money! Dollars continued to increase as community began to GROW.

The truth is, people liked the process so much it increased the market share 126% in four months. SOAR’s program was published and a membership program built. Now, development professionals come to SOAR for support. They pay $34 a month for the privilege of having a fundraising professional in their corner.

Support with SOAR membership looks like this (three highlights):

  • Group contact with other fundraising professionals to get ideas AND see what really works prior to investing too much time and energy
  • Trainings and meetings for development professionals are organized – you just show up
  • SOAR is available for your call – you can share what you’ve having trouble with and SOAR offers advice on the best steps to proceed

Ready to spend $34 on your future success with fundraising – click here!

Unsure of how SOAR fits into your current fundraising program? Schedule a brief strategy call – click here!

 

1 in 7 seniors live in poverty – See dramatic ads used to create awareness

#SOARwithnetworkfundraising joins the cause to help our seniors in poverty and reposts this article from link here.

“Today, 1 in 7 seniors live in poverty,” said AARP Foundation President Lisa Marsh Ryerson. “Senior poverty is a widespread and deeply disturbing problem in the U.S. — but it’s often hidden from sight.”

She continued, “These ads are a call to bring senior poverty out of the shadows and into the mainstream American narrative. They’re a rallying cry for action that fosters resilience, strengthens communities and restores hope.”

The two spots dramatize the challenges faced by older adults who struggle to meet their basic needs.

In “Garage Sale,” an older man tags his possessions in preparation for a garage sale. He then sits in a lawn chair, watching apprehensively as people look over his possessions. Rather than prices, however, each tag displays what the purchase will enable him to afford: “dinner tonight” … “bus fare” … “heart medicine.”

In the second spot, “Table,” the camera focuses on a plain table topped with photo frames and mail. The voiceover tells us that after 30 years of the table being an anchor, a mailroom, a community board, a memorial … these days, it’s a very different story. The camera zooms in on a final eviction notice as movers sweep the items off the table and into boxes, and follows them as they haul the table out of the house.

Both spots end with the message, “Even when you prepare, life doesn’t always go as planned. Today, 1 in 7 seniors live in poverty. To learn how you can help, visit aarpfoundation.org.”

See the spots:

Garage Sale: https://youtu.be/o-6HR4cwgzM

Table: https://youtu.be/JSDL3u-IsTk

The print effort features the faces of seniors living at or near the poverty level. With a headline that reads simply, “The face of poverty isn’t who you think,” they capture their subjects’ dignity and resilience. The portrait-style images were shot by world-renowned photographer, Platon, whose work has graced over 20 Time magazine covers.

Screen shot 2018-08-27 at 12.25.52 PM

AARP Foundation worked with Grey New York, AARP’s agency of record, to create an integrated campaign that includes online video, social media, digital, public relations and special events. It will appear across AARP’s communications channels, including aarpfoundation.org, with over 1 million unique visitors; AARP The Magazine, which with 38.3 million readers is America’s most-read magazine; and AARP Bulletin, which reaches more than 30 million readers with 10 print editions annually.

About AARP Foundation

AARP Foundation works to end senior poverty by helping vulnerable older adults build economic opportunity and social connectedness. As AARP’s charitable affiliate, we serve AARP members and nonmembers alike. Bolstered by vigorous legal advocacy, we spark bold, innovative solutions that foster resilience, strengthen communities and restore hope.

AARP Foundation. For a future without senior poverty.

About Grey

Grey is the advertising network of Grey Group, which ranks among the largest global communications companies. Its parent company is WPP (NYSE : WPP ). Under the banner of “Grey Famously Effective Since 1917,” the agency serves a blue-chip roster of many of the world’s best known companies: Procter & Gamble, GlaxoSmithKline, Kellogg’s, Pfizer, Canon, NFL, Marriott Hotels & Resorts, Nestlé, Walgreens, Applebee’s and T.J. Maxx.

Contact: Owen J. Dougherty  

212-546-2551 

owen.dougherty@grey.com

Relationships with Grantors – Four Tips

We love this statement by Amy Clinton, “The overall success of a grant writer should ultimately be measured by whether or not the organization for which that person is writing grants is building relationships and program credibility with funders and achieving incremental increases in grant funding revenues.”

Recently, an organization in our community saw the deletion of a grant they depended on. It was something they had received for years and at the end, the $125,000 they received last year, just went away without warning. That destroys programs and, it did! The program it funded was shut down.

Relationships and program credibility – how are you building them?

Tip #1: Share your message as often as you can with as many people as you can in the most-effective way.

Tip #2: Offer opportunities for people to be involved in your program and even invite the people within the organization/foundation granting money. They are not likely to attend but will appreciate the thought of inclusion to see how their money is being used.

Tip #3: Accept the way people participate in your program. This helps you to keep momentum going and maintains a positive perspective. A happy person says good things and can provide a testimonial for you later on. This looks good on applications.

Tip#4: Respect and appreciate everyone within your community. By this, we mean anyone associated with your mission and your organization. The same is true with those organizations offering similar services. Maintain the feeling of abundance. There’s enough to go around. Be thankful. SOAR (acronym for relationship development, which is outlined above).

Consider the following data, also provided by Amy Clinton (see her full article):

1. If an organization is submitting applications to already-established funders who know them well, they can expect:

a. For existing programs, high success rates, up to 90 percent
b. For expanding existing programs, good success rates, up to 80 percent
c. For new programs, lower success rates, generally 30 to 40 percent

2. If submitting applications to NEW funders, an excellent success rate would be 30 to 40 percent

3. If submitting applications to a combination of existing and new funders, an organization should expect a success rate of between 50 and 60 percent.


#soarwithnetworkfundraising assists organizations and individuals when they are determining the best way to GROW Community among their constituents. Increasing market share and raising money goes hand in hand. It’s easy when you choose to SOAR.

choosing to SOAR

Fundraising Goals – In the Bag!

Basically, “in the bag” means your fundraising is secured! You know it’s true because you’ve already accomplished the goal. Whew – a sigh of relief.

Last quarter of the year…is it really in the bag or are you kidding yourself?

As a nonprofit, it can be hard to focus on year-end goals when it’s only August. You undoubtably wear many hats in the organization. It can be even harder to decide what you need to do to achieve success when you’re still trying to meet Q2 or Q3 financial goals. Q4 builds powerful momentum for 2019. Speaking of ways to do this:

1. HAVE A CONSISTENT STORY TO SHARE

A story builds trust in your mission.  It has the potential to increase donations when the story is one people repeat to others. The same story has time to build momentum, and you’ll also save resources when you avoid creating something new. ALL. THE. TIME.

2. CUSTOMIZE HOW YOU COMMUNICATE

A donor is different than someone new learning about your program. Look at your connections and specifically at your monthly donation amounts. Align the way you communicate with different donor segments. Check your social media accounts to see which posts get the most engagement, and build articles for newsletters and subsequent posts based upon those topics. Share with people donating to your organization (time, money, resources).

Customizing communication increases trust in your organization.

3. APPRECIATE DONORS AND VOLUNTEERS

Connect with highly engaged donors and volunteers, who frequently support your mission. They are your advocates. They share your mission with others in a GOOD way when they feel respected. Now is the time to make sure there’s a program of appreciation in place, which is well-developed within your organization.

4. CONNECT WITH BUSINESSES AND SPONSORS

Increase awareness and revenue for your nonprofit when you grow the awareness of your organization within your community. Meet with people and share your mission. This is not asking people for donations unless they are ready to give.

Get to the top of your market because people have confidence and trust in you. Take the test! Prove it. Here’s a quick way to decipher your trustworthiness:

  • Do you serve the best interests of others?
    (Not your own interests)
  • Do you communicate all the information people need to be successful?
    (Don’t make assumptions about what you think “they can handle”. Leaders who underestimate the intelligence of their teams generally overestimate their own.)
  • Do you keep your commitments?
    (Leaders must watch their words because even a casual comment can be interpreted as a commitment.)

Keeping commitments is very important to establish trust.

SOAR is dedicated to helping businesses, non-profits and donors build community. Email us at iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com with questions.

 

Getting donations because your non-profit gives the donors what they want

A list, compiled through donor interviews, is below. These are the common answers for what a donor wants in order to feel good about a donation they make.

  • good community standing for the non-profit they donate to
  • a non-profit that works with others to pool resources
  • respected fundraising tools
  • fiscal responsibility of how they spend the gifts they get
  • not being asked again and again for gifts to fund the same purpose
  • donation they make reflect positively on themselves
  • a feel-good system in place for everyone involved
  • a well-outlined strategic plan for the future of how the money they give now impacts the future
  • a realistic fundraising plan with resources already in place
  • realistic and clear goals determined by the non-profit
  • financial report to share
  • legitimate mission, vision and purpose defined
  • adequate service area in the community
  • impact metrics for when their donation is made
  • a way to connect the donor to the mission
  • updates on progress as well as outcomes of their gift
  • ways to create a personal connection for the donor
  • respect for the donor (thank you’s and acknowledgements done promptly)
  • a trustworthy cause to give to, meaning the non-profit accepts responsibility, and stands by their decisions
  • attention to solicitation requests made – the number sent, the messaging, and the follow through afterwards
  • Transparency of the organization and all systems (they do not want to be asked by more than one person for the same thing)
  • a way for the donor to make a difference with whatever they give
  • heart-warming stories
  • clear explanation of need so there’s no guessing
  • excellent customer service
  • a way to solicit donors for advice
  • a way for donors to be heroes
  • honesty
  • online systems – updated and accurate
  • good communications
  • photos of how dollars are impacting society – the results
  • an organized way to volunteer their time

A person who feels good about their donation opens the door for others to give because they share their great experience. It also gives them the idea to give again, and to potentially give more.

SOAR is a relationship program, an acronym, which covers all the bases for helping non-profits coordinate the above list. It’s a way to grow market share and increase dollars.

S – share your message

O – offer opportunities for involvement

A – accept the way people want to participate

R – respect and appreciate others

People who SOAR spread their networking arms, expand their market, and increase the dollars they raise. They SOAR – all of the time with practices they implement. To learn more – iwantto@soarwithnetworkfundraising.com